Indication and Limitations of Use:

  • Parsabiv® (etelcalcetide) is indicated for the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism (HPT) in adult patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) on hemodialysis. Read More
  • Parsabiv® (etelcalcetide) has not been studied in adult patients with parathyroid carcinoma, primary hyperparathyroidism, or with CKD who are not on hemodialysis and is not recommended for use in these populations. Close
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David Henner
David Henner
Abdul Abdellatif
abdul_desktop-new
Debbie Glidden
Debbie Glidden

Dr. David Henner

Nephrologist

Years in Practice:
21+

Location:
Pittsfield, MA

Dr. Abdul Abdellatif

Nephrologist

Years in Practice:
15+

Location:
Houston, TX

Debbie Glidden

Nurse Practitioner

Years in Practice:
18+

Location:
Orlando, FL
Dr. Henner spends much of his time educating patients and physicians. He practices a dynamic team approach in which nurses, social workers, technicians, and dietitians work together.
Dr. Abdellatif’s patients consistently call him “kind and caring.” He is honored to have received the Compassionate Doctor Award and Patient’s Choice Award for many years.
Ms. Glidden is passionate about nephrology and dialysis. As a nurse practitioner, she enjoys working independently with patients and helping them manage their health.
  • Dr. David Henner
  • Dr. Abdul Abdellatif
  • Debbie Glidden, NP
What was treating sHPT like prior to calcimimetics?

In the past, when I would think about treating secondary hyperparathyroidism, it was a lot like juggling. Treatment for me could include giving my patients phosphate binders and vitamin D. Sometimes, the phosphate binders would cause my patient’s calcium levels to go up. And if you give vitamin D, that could raise the calcium and phosphorus; so in those instances it would feel like you’re kind of chasing your tail.

What impact has Parsabiv® (etelcalcetide) had on your patients and the treatment of sHPT?

Parsabiv® has had a huge impact on what we do at our practice in regards to the way we treat sHPT. For myself, and most of my colleagues, we routinely write Parsabiv® for appropriate patients. And I see that trend continuing because we have seen good results when managing sHPT with Parsabiv®.

What would you say to any clinicians out there who are wondering if Parsabiv® could be right for their patients?

I would say, if you have a patient who you believe could benefit from a treatment like Parsabiv® (etelcalcetide), you have to advocate for them. And I do that every day. Ultimately, we’ve got to do what we feel is right for our patients. I couldn’t sleep at night unless I felt “today, I did all I can for my patients.” That’s my responsibility—and I think most nephrologists feel the same way.

Individual results may vary

Early Experience

Parsabiv® in Practice

Care Team Dynamics

What were your expectations when you first started to prescribe Parsabiv®?

I was cautiously optimistic that Parsabiv® (etelcalcetide) would help, because now we are in control of administering the medication to our patients. Parsabiv® further justified my belief in calcimimetics.

Can you share a patient success story that makes you especially proud?

I have this one patient with sHPT—she had a wake-up call when I recommended she meet with a surgeon. Up until then, she wasn’t very active in her care. As soon as Parsabiv® (etelcalcetide) came out, she was the first patient in her dialysis unit to receive it. We initiated her on 5 milligrams, 3 times a week at the end of hemodialysis, and we titrated her dose based on her labs. We didn’t even need to titrate to the maximum dose and in a few months her PTH was in range. After a year of treatment on Parsabiv®, her PTH is still in range without me having to significantly change her dose. Her secondary hyperparathyroidism is well managed and she is more active in her care.

What was it like to be able to deliver good news to a patient?

It feels great to share good news with patients, because frankly these are people who may not be used to hearing a lot of good news. That’s really inspiring to me, and now I am working very closely with my care team to monitor and identify other patients who may be appropriate for Parsabiv® (etelcalcetide).

Early Experience

Parsabiv® in Practice

Making a Difference

Care Team Dynamics

How do you go about starting a new patient on Parsabiv®?

First and foremost, I will write Parsabiv® when I feel it’s important for us to control administration. We initiate Parsabiv® (etelcalcetide) for appropriate patients in order to manage their sHPT. We start them out at the approved dose, which is 5 mg 3 times a week, at the end of hemodialysis. It’s important to ensure that a patient’s serum calcium is at or above the lower limit of normal before initiating Parsabiv®. Following initiation, check the patient’s calcium levels after 1 week, then every 4 weeks after that. Also, you need to check the patient’s PTH levels after 4 weeks, then continue to check PTH based on whatever your practice does. Of course, all dosing and monitoring information can be found in the package insert.

Once you’ve decided to prescribe Parsabiv®, we need to work with our dialysis organization to make sure we get that patient on Parsabiv®.

Why do you think Parsabiv® (etelcalcetide) is worth advocating for?

I cannot stress enough the peace of mind I have knowing that I control administration with Parsabiv®. I’ve been in dialysis over 35 years and I’ve seen what these patients go through. It’s not an easy life. That’s why I fight for Parsabiv®—I do it for my patients because I care about them, and I’ve seen the difference Parsabiv® can make. And that’s what matters most to me. It works.

How does your care team work together to make things run smoothly?

We work together to establish great communication, which relates to everyone knowing what our treatment goals are for sHPT—aligning on what labs we want to achieve and how to get there. Also knowing what triggers exist when it’s time to start a new therapy.

Parsabiv® in Practice

Making a Difference

Care Team Dynamics

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EFFICACY

See how Parsabiv® performed in clinical studies and its use in real-world outcomes

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REIMBURSEMENT

Parsabiv® reimbursement options are available for patients

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REAL-WORLD EVIDENCE

See an analysis from
hundreds of real-world
treatment experiences

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Important Safety Information for Parsabiv®

Contraindication: Parsabiv® (etelcalcetide) is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to etelcalcetide or any of its excipients. Hypersensitivity reactions, including face edema and anaphylactic reaction, have occurred.

Hypocalcemia: Parsabiv® lowers serum calcium and can lead to hypocalcemia, sometimes severe. Significant lowering of serum calcium can cause QT interval prolongation and ventricular arrhythmia. Patients with conditions that predispose to QT interval prolongation and ventricular arrhythmia may be at increased risk for QT interval prolongation and ventricular arrhythmias if they develop hypocalcemia due

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Important Safety Information for Parsabiv®

Contraindication: Parsabiv® (etelcalcetide) is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to etelcalcetide or any of its excipients. Hypersensitivity reactions, including face edema and anaphylactic reaction, have occurred.

Hypocalcemia: Parsabiv® lowers serum calcium and can lead to hypocalcemia, sometimes severe. Significant lowering of serum calcium can cause QT interval prolongation and ventricular arrhythmia. Patients with conditions that predispose to QT interval prolongation and ventricular arrhythmia may be at increased risk for QT interval prolongation and ventricular arrhythmias if they develop hypocalcemia due to Parsabiv®. Closely monitor corrected serum calcium and QT interval in patients at risk on Parsabiv®.

Significant reductions in corrected serum calcium may lower the threshold for seizures. Patients with a history of seizure disorder may be at increased risk for seizures if they develop hypocalcemia due to Parsabiv®. Monitor corrected serum calcium in patients with seizure disorders on Parsabiv®.

Concurrent administration of Parsabiv® with another oral calcimimetic could result in severe, life-threatening hypocalcemia. Patients switching from cinacalcet to Parsabiv® should discontinue cinacalcet for at least 7 days prior to initiating Parsabiv®. Closely monitor corrected serum calcium in patients receiving Parsabiv® and concomitant therapies known to lower serum calcium.

Measure corrected serum calcium prior to initiation of Parsabiv®. Do not initiate in patients if the corrected serum calcium is less than the lower limit of normal. Monitor corrected serum calcium within 1 week after initiation or dose adjustment and every 4 weeks during treatment with Parsabiv®. Measure PTH 4 weeks after initiation or dose adjustment of Parsabiv®. Once the maintenance dose has been established, measure PTH per clinical practice.

Worsening Heart Failure: In Parsabiv® clinical studies, cases of hypotension, congestive heart failure, and decreased myocardial performance have been reported. Closely monitor patients treated with Parsabiv® for worsening signs and symptoms of heart failure.

Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: In clinical studies, 2 patients treated with Parsabiv® in 1253 patient years of exposure had upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding at the time of death. The exact cause of GI bleeding in these patients is unknown and there were too few cases to determine whether these cases were related to Parsabiv®.

Patients with risk factors for upper GI bleeding, such as known gastritis, esophagitis, ulcers or severe vomiting, may be at increased risk for GI bleeding with Parsabiv®. Monitor patients for worsening of common Parsabiv® GI adverse reactions and for signs and symptoms of GI bleeding and ulcerations during Parsabiv® therapy.

Adynamic Bone: Adynamic bone may develop if PTH levels are chronically suppressed.

Adverse Reactions: In clinical trials of patients with secondary HPT comparing Parsabiv® to placebo, the most common adverse reactions were blood calcium decreased (64% vs. 10%), muscle spasms (12% vs. 7%), diarrhea (11% vs. 9%), nausea (11% vs. 6%), vomiting (9% vs. 5%), headache (8% vs. 6%), hypocalcemia (7% vs. 0.2%), and paresthesia (6% vs. 1%).

Indication

Parsabiv® (etelcalcetide) is indicated for the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism (HPT) in adult patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) on hemodialysis.

Limitations of Use:

Parsabiv® has not been studied in adult patients with parathyroid carcinoma, primary hyperparathyroidism, or with CKD who are not on hemodialysis and is not recommended for use in these populations.

Please see Parsabiv® (etelcalcetide) full Prescribing Information.